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Dr Valerie Daniel on Unconscious bias and the pedagogical implications

In this interview, we discuss what we mean by 'unconscious bias' and why it's important that we should know this. Dr Daniel then goes on to explain how this knowledge (or lack of!) can affect our day-to-day pedagogy with the children. 
· June 4, 2021

Dr Valerie Daniel is a qualified Teacher with over 30 years’ experience with the last 13 years as a Maintained Nursery School head teacher.

Her other roles include being a trustee for the Birmingham Nursery Schools Collaboration Trust (BNSCT) currently the chair of the Trust as well as sitting on a number of Local Authority Strategic groups.

She is one of fifteen Birmingham Association of Maintained Nursery Schools (BAMNS) head teachers who work within a contractual collaboration. Valerie has a deep interest in the dynamics of the current Early Years Sector and received her Doctorate in Education from the University of Birmingham on her thesis titled ‘The Perceptions of a Leadership Crisis in the Early Years Sector (EYS)’. She is also a trained Systems Leader and Leadership Mentor for other head teachers and leaders in the Early Years Sector.

In this interview, we discuss what we mean by ‘unconscious bias’ and why it’s important that we should know this. Dr Daniel then goes on to explain how this knowledge (or lack of!) can affect our day-to-day pedagogy with the children.  She also has some great advice on how the whole staff team can work together on unconscious bias and antibias.

Links:

You can find Dr Daniel here: https://twitter.com/Valerie_JKD

And her poem, The Underlying Fact here: https://earlyyearsreviews.co.uk/podcast/the-underlying-fact-poem-by-dr-valerie-daniel/

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Episode Includes

  • 1 Video
  • Episode Certificate
  • In this interview, we discuss what we mean by 'unconscious bias' and why it's important that we should know this. Dr Daniel then goes on to explain how this knowledge (or lack of!) can affect our day-to-day pedagogy with the children. 

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