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Anthony Semann on Early Childhood Education Environments

In this interview, Anthony advocates that it is a right, not a privilege, for children to encounter beauty and this elevates their lives. He explains how the outdoor areas that could be described as ‘boutiques of despair’ show both a lack of professionalism and reduce the learning opportunities for children as well. He has some excellent advice on debating with educators on what is NOT acceptable in the space, leaving plenty of scope for everyone’s pedagogy to be incorporated.

I also asked Anthony about sustainability. He explained that economic sustainability has to include thinking about why resources may be cheap and the ethics of cheap labour; how keeping plastic toys may be better for the environment, until they are no longer fit for purpose; and how we should consider food choices from a sustainability standpoint. Very thought-provoking and fresh thinking about a complex subject.
· December 17, 2021

Anthony Semann of Semann & Slattery, based in New South Wales, is a presenter and researcher, with a background in education, research and management.

His expertise as a researcher and his specialist knowledge of Early Education has seen him work across Australia, Asia, Europe, America, France and New Zealand. He has delivered hundreds of key notes and papers at conferences and over 15,000 professional development programs over the last 20 years.

Anthony challenges organisations and people. He asks them to reflect because their communication, their leadership, their values, their relationships and their workplace culture and diversity affect what they do. He asks them to reflect because it is these things that affect their services, businesses and ultimately the community.

In this interview, Anthony advocates that it is a right, not a privilege, for children to encounter beauty and this elevates their lives. He explains how the outdoor areas that could be described as ‘boutiques of despair’ show both a lack of professionalism and reduce the learning opportunities for children as well. He has some excellent advice on debating with educators on what is NOT acceptable in the space, leaving plenty of scope for everyone’s pedagogy to be incorporated.

I also asked Anthony about sustainability. He explained that economic sustainability has to include thinking about why resources may be cheap and the ethics of cheap labour; how keeping plastic toys may be better for the environment, until they are no longer fit for purpose; and how we should consider food choices from a sustainability standpoint. Very thought-provoking and fresh thinking about a complex subject.

Links:

http://semannslattery.com/

https://www.tribalnationsmaps.com/store/p530/The_AIATSIS_Map_of_Indigenous_Australia_-_large_poster.html

https://www.mca.com.au/artists-works/artists/jonathan-jones/

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Episode Includes

  • 1 Video
  • Episode Certificate
  • In this interview, Anthony advocates that it is a right, not a privilege, for children to encounter beauty and this elevates their lives. He explains how the outdoor areas that could be described as ‘boutiques of despair’ show both a lack of professionalism and reduce the learning opportunities for children as well. He has some excellent advice on debating with educators on what is NOT acceptable in the space, leaving plenty of scope for everyone’s pedagogy to be incorporated.

    I also asked Anthony about sustainability. He explained that economic sustainability has to include thinking about why resources may be cheap and the ethics of cheap labour; how keeping plastic toys may be better for the environment, until they are no longer fit for purpose; and how we should consider food choices from a sustainability standpoint. Very thought-provoking and fresh thinking about a complex subject.

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